đź“… Tuesday 23rd May at 9:30-17.00 BST
đź“Ť USW Conference Centre, Treforest, CF37 1DL

The Global Solidarity Summit brings together individuals and organisations from Wales working on solidarity projects across the world. From small community groups to Wales-based branches of international NGOs, we’re raising the profile of the sector in Wales.

The 2023 Summit will take place on Tuesday 23rd May at the University of South Wales Conference Centre in Treforest. Just minutes on foot from Treforest train station and with quick, easy access to the M4, this dedicated, purpose-built conference centre is just 20 minutes from the capital city.

(Re)Connecting Communities is the Summit theme. As we continue to adjust to post-Covid realities, this will be an invaluable opportunity to hear from leading voices in the sector while meeting and networking with colleagues and peers.

For the first time, the Summit will be a hybrid event, and participants will be able to join the plenary sessions and one workshop online if they cannot attend in person.

Kaleidoscope Trust executive director Lady Phyll and television presenter and producer Mo Jannah will be our keynote speakers, with Welsh Government minister Jane Hutt MS delivering the opening address. Panellists for the afternoon discussion will consist of winners of the 2023 Partnership Awards.

The four workshops will cover a range of topics, including climate change, land rights, digital inclusion and data-led communication. A safeguarding fringe event and a drumming workshop will be held during the lunch break, and the day will conclude with a networking reception.

We’re looking forward to seeing you in Treforest or online!

Catch up on the 2021 and 2022 Global Solidarity Summit videos on-demand on our YouTube channel.

Registration

09:30 – 10:00

Delegates are encouraged to arrive in good time. Tea and coffee will be provided during registration.


Welcome and Opening Address

10:00 – 10:30

Jane Hutt MS, Minister for Social Justice, will deliver the opening address following a welcome to delegates to the 2023 Global Solidarity Conference by Claire O’Shea, Head of Partnership at Hub Cymru Africa.

Online delegates will be able to watch this session.


Morning Keynote Address

10:30 – 11:00

Phyllis Opoku-Gyimah (aka Lady Phyll), Co-Founder and Executive Director of UK Black Pride and Executive Director of Kaleidoscope Trust, will deliver the morning keynote address.

Online delegates will be able to watch this session and ask questions via Slido.


Workshops

11:30 – 12:30

Delegates attending in person may choose one of four workshops:

1. Practical Responses to Climate Change

Climate change is already harming people across the world and many parts of Africa have been ravaged by droughts, floods and severe weather. This workshop will look at what Wales-Africa partnerships can do to understand and reduce the environmental impacts of their work. We will also talk about how project work, including support for Fair Trade producers, can help communities to adapt to a changing climate.

2. Land rights and ownership: issues facing women and indigenous communities

Many women and indigenous communities across Africa have no access to land nor the right to buy or inherit land. This reduces their ability to earn money or grow food for their families, restricting economic development and efforts to achieve equality. This workshop will look at the roots, complexities and implications of the problem, including laws and social customs. It is an opportunity to learn more, share experiences and explore what Welsh-African partnerships can do to support women and indigenous communities seeking and protecting land.

3. Engaging your audience effectively: data-led communications

This workshop is aimed at groups and people who want to build support and communicate effectively with their audiences. Development Engagement Lab will show us the latest research on attitudes to aid and how that can be used to shape the way you talk about your work based on data, research and audience insight.

4. Digital inclusion in Africa

By the end of the decade, 230 million jobs in Africa will require some level of digital skills. What does this mean for the huge digital skills gap on the continent that is currently diluting economic opportunities? This workshop will focus on how the digital divide within and between African countries can be challenged, including by improving access to information technologies and increasing awareness of digital spaces for women, refugees and persons with disabilities.

Online delegates will be able to watch workshop no. 3, Engaging your audience effectively: data-led communications.


Lunch | Safeguarding Fringe Workshop | Drumming Fringe Workshop

12:30 – 13:30

A vegetarian buffet will be provided. Dietary requirements can be detailed during registration through Eventbrite.

During the lunch break, a fringe workshop will be held for delegates to discuss their safeguarding support needs, and another workshop will allow delegates to try their hands at Gambian drumming.


Afternoon Keynote Address

13:30 – 14:00

Mo Jannah, BBC One Wales presenter, television producer and life coach, will deliver the afternoon keynote address.

Online delegates will be able to watch this session and ask questions via Slido.


Workshops

14:00 – 15:00

Delegates attending in person may choose one of four workshops:

1. Practical Responses to Climate Change

Climate change is already harming people across the world and many parts of Africa have been ravaged by droughts, floods and severe weather. This workshop will look at what Wales-Africa partnerships can do to understand and reduce the environmental impacts of their work. We will also talk about how project work, including support for Fair Trade producers, can help communities to adapt to a changing climate.

2. Land rights and ownership: issues facing women and indigenous communities

Many women across Africa have no access to land nor the right to buy or inherit land. This reduces their ability to earn money or grow food for their families, restricting economic development and efforts to achieve equality. This workshop will look at the roots, complexities and implications of the problem, including laws and social customs. It is an opportunity to learn more, share experiences and explore what Welsh-African partnerships can do to support women seeking land.

3. Engaging your audience effectively: data led communications

This workshop is aimed at groups and people who want to build support and communicate effectively with their audiences. Development Engagement Lab will show us the latest research on attitudes to aid and how that can be used to shape the way you talk about your work based on data, research and audience insight.

4. Digital inclusion in Africa

This workshop aims to facilitate discussion and bring awareness to digital inclusion in Africa. It will highlight the digital divide that exists not only between high- and low-income nations, but also within African nations; as well as in areas such as gender, ability and more on the African continent.

Online delegates will be shown a relevant, pre-recorded video from our archive.


Panel Discussion

15:30 – 16:30

The panel will consist of winners of the 2023 Partnership Awards. Winners of the Awards will be announced on 16th May.

Online delegates will be able to watch this session and ask questions via Slido.


Networking Reception

16:30 – 17:00

Refreshments will be provided while delegates use this opportunity to meet, greet, catch up and network.


Carol Adams

Workshop: Practical responses to climate change

Carol Adams is Managing Director of Food Adventure Social Enterprise and leads on a learning exchange between Wales and Cameroon focusing on sustainable food processing. She is an Honorary Principal Lecturer at Cardiff Metropolitan University and has a background in social and economic development, and sustainable agri-food systems.

Carol is an avid knitter and enjoys making fruit and vegetable preserves. She is of Bahamian, American and Cameroonian heritage.


Rochelle Ampomah-Ababio

Workshop: Digital inclusion in Africa

Rochelle Ampomah-Ababio is the founder of The Three Es Africa, an e-learning community for women in Africa focused on career and personal development. She is also a trustee at Youth Link Networks, a charity that supports young women in Uganda to create reusable sanitary towels. In this role, she is responsible for building CSR relationships and ensuring the charity complies with all legal duties.

Her commitment to international issues is also reflected in her participation as a delegate at the United Nations Convention on the Rights of a Child and the first Pan-African Youth Summit to end FGM. Rochelle is preparing to become a trainee solicitor at Taylor Wessing, a leading UK law firm.


Molly Anders

Workshop: Engaging your audience effectively

Molly Anders is the Research, Impact, Communications and Engagement Lead at the Development Engagement Lab. She is also the Partner Activation Consultant for its work in Great Britain.

As a Research Fellow in the Department of Political Science, University College London, Molly studies public attitudes towards global poverty. A Fulbright scholar, her earlier research explored public attitudes and media coverage of aid efforts in the Middle East, as well as the presence of state-sponsored media support in Jordan, Palestine and Syria. She is a former UK senior correspondent for Devex.


Lorna Brown

Workshop: Practical responses to climate change

Lorna Brown is the co-founder of the charity Dolen Ffermio (Farming Link), which has rural community links with Ngora and Kamuli districts in the Eastern Region of Uganda. She is the Wales lead on livestock breeding, agroforestry, renewable energy and biogas projects.

As a veterinary surgeon, Lorna specialises in breeding technology for sheep and goats. She worked as a lecturer and researcher in Nigeria and Kiribati before running a mixed veterinary practice in Wales.


Barbara Davies-Quy

Workshop: Land rights and ownership

Barbara Davies-Quy is Deputy Director of Size of Wales. She leads on policy work to tackle overseas deforestation footprint and manage Size of Wales work overseas to protect tropical forests and grow trees.

Barbara has over 15 years of international development experience supporting indigenous and local communities to protect their lands and forests, develop sustainable livelihood opportunities and tackle climate change. She has led international advocacy work at UK, European Union and United Nations levels.


Jane Hutt MS

Opening Address

Jane Hutt MS is Minister for Social Justice and Chief Whip in the Welsh Government. Among her ministerial responsibilities are the Wales and Africa programme; digital inclusion; equality and human rights; coordination of issues relating to asylum seekers and refugees; national implementation of the Well-being of Future Generations framework; and the Social Partnership and Public Procurement Bill.

Jane spent part of her childhood in Uganda and Kenya, and has lived and worked in Wales since 1972. A member of the Senedd since its creation in 1999, she has served in every administration to date and in several of the most senior roles in government, including as Minister for Finance and Leader of the House.


Mo Jannah

Afternoon Keynote Address

Mo Jannah is a television presenter, producer, life coach and entrepreneur. Growing up in Cardiff, he worked with young offenders and youth services before making the move into broadcasting through the It’s My Shout training programme, which helps develop new talent for the film and television industry in Wales.

In 2018, Mo was the subject of the New Voices from Wales episode “Mo’s World”, a documentary focusing on his life coaching work and interventions with young marginalised men from Cardiff and Newport. He has since became a regular face to viewers of BBC One Wales as a reporter on the consumer rights show X-Ray. Mo also developed a sports documentary for BBC Wales and authored his own on-line series about Black History.


N’famady KouyatĂ©

Fringe event: Drumming workshop

N’famady KouyatĂ© is Artistic Director and Joint CEO of The Successors of the Mandingue. He is a master balafonist, singer, percussionist, multi-instrumentalist, and the founder of Les HĂ©ritiers du Mandingue, a traditional Mandingue-modern fusion group in Guinea.

Born into a griot/djeli family with hereditary responsibility for preserving traditional Mandingue culture through the sharing of ancient rhythms, songs, and stories, N’famady now resides in Cardiff. He has pioneered several solo and collaborative musical projects, and is an energetic participatory music workshop leader.


Thembi Mnisi

Workshop: Practical responses to climate change

[Biography coming soon]
Paolo Morini

Workshop: Engaging your audience effectively

Paolo Morini is a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Political Science, University College London. As a Development Engagement Lab researcher, he researches how messengers, messages and images can be used as part of global poverty campaigns to engage the public in France, Germany, Great Britain and the United States.

Paolo’s ongoing projects include comparative research to understand what drives public support for development aid, and decisions to volunteer time for or donate money to global poverty causes.


Phoebe Ndiema

Workshop: Land rights and ownership

Phoebe Ndiema works with the Chepkitale Indigenous People Development Project to ensure the tenure, environmental and human rights of the Ogiek people. She leads on gender justice projects that focus on leadership and governance, economic empowerment, and capacity building. She also leads the Boititap Korenyo (“Wealth of Our Land”) project to map the Ogiek’s territory and resources, and another project that documents the history of the 32 clans that define the Ogiek community.

Phoebe has been a Fellow at Oxford University in the Department of Biology, developing a community led biodiversity monitoring system. She was born and raised in the Mt. Elgon region of western Kenya and is part of the Ogiek indigenous community.


Phyll Opoku-Gyimah (Lady Phyll)

Morning Keynote Address

Phyll Opoku-Gyimah is the nucleus of the award-winning celebration and protest that is UK Black Pride. Widely known as Lady Phyll – partly due to her decision to reject an MBE in the New Year’s Honours’ list to protest Britain’s role in formulating anti-LGBTQI+ penal codes across its empire – she is also the executive director of Kaleidoscope Trust, an organisation working to uphold the human rights of LGBTQI+ people around the world; a community builder and organiser; an Albert Kennedy Trust patron; and a public speaker focusing on race, gender, sexuality and class.

She’s regularly called upon to advise nascent LGBTQI+ organisations around the world to help leaders create cogent organising strategies, establish robust partnership networks and work effectively in service of the LGBTQI+ community.


Joe Robinson

Workshop: Practical responses to climate change

[Biography coming soon]
Graham Thursby

Fringe event: Safeguarding for small organisations

Graham Thursby is Safeguarding and HR Adviser at Bond. He leads the coordination and delivery of Bond’s safeguarding work to secure sector-wide improvements in the quality and consistency of safeguarding in development assistance and humanitarian aid.

Graham is also responsible for developing and delivering improvements to Bond’s internal HR policies and processes.


Pubudini Wickramaratne

Workshop: Land rights and ownership

Pubudini Wickramaratne is the Land Rights Policy Lead at Oxfam International. Leading global policy advocacy, she works closely with country offices and regions to ensure that communities fighting for their land rights are supported and their voices are heard at national and global policy forums. Prior to joining Oxfam International, she served as the country director of the Centre on Housing Rights and Evictions in Sri Lanka.

Pubudini has over twenty years of experience working on policy advocacy on socio-economic rights, and land rights in particular. She is a lawyer by profession and has extensive experience in human rights and public law-related litigation in Sri Lanka.

Disability Information and Support Network

DISN is a diaspora network working with partners in Kenya and Wales. Through advocacy and training, our mission is to build communities in which people with disabilities can realise their potential as equal and active citizens, in control of their lives. We also work with fair trade retailers to support disabled craftsmen and -women to sell their products.


Fair Trade Wales

Fair Trade Wales grows, supports and promotes the Fair Trade movement. This year, we’re celebrating 15 years since Wales made history in becoming the world’s first Fair Trade Nation. Head over to our stall to learn about Fair Trade, our plans to celebrate, and how your ethical choices compare to those of the wider Welsh public.


FLOW (Care for Uganda)

FLOW is the community health team of Care for Uganda, providing funding and support for motorbike ambulances and Village Health Teams in the rural district of Lowero. The stall will be selling jewellery, greetings cards, stationery, toys, purses, textiles and other crafts made in Uganda. We also have locally made crafts using textiles from Uganda.


Kanuma Krafts

We work with batik artists trying to keep alive the handwork industry of traditional methods which take many years to learn. We do original dying using kola nuts and indigo herbs and we work with local tailors who produce garments by machine and hand, for a living wage, putting modern themes into traditional techniques.


Size of Wales

Size of Wales supports Indigenous and local communities to protect and restore tropical forests and inspires climate action here in Wales. Come to our stall where you will find more about our inspiring overseas partners and what we can do here in Wales to tackle our overseas deforestation footprint.


Sub-Sahara Advisory Panel

Sub-Sahara Advisory Panel was formed by African diaspora groups in Wales to collectively advance their common interest in local issues affecting African communities in Wales as well as those in Africa. We utilise skills, capacity and knowledge found within Welsh African diaspora communities for the benefit of all. Come and talk to us about African communities in Wales and their connections to international solidarity and community development in Wales.


The Successors of the Mandingue

The Successors of the Mandingue are a Cardiff-based African arts organisation that builds bridges between musical cultures and brings together artists, communities, and their ideas. Join our lunchtime drumming workshop and visit our stall to learn about our upcoming Dathliad Cymru-Affrica (“Wales-Africa Celebration”) Festival in Bethesda (1st-3rd June) and Cardiff (10th-11th June).


Tropical Health and Education Trust

THET supports health partnerships between UK and overseas health institutions. Come to our stall to hear from marginalised voices of diaspora NHS staff in Experts in Our Midst. Learn how these staff members play a valuable role in health partnerships, the scale of their engagement, and the challenges they face, and how to promote their positive impact on global health projects.


Wales and Africa (Welsh Government)

The Wales and Africa programme supports people in Wales to take action on poverty in Africa. Visit our stall to learn about the Welsh Government’s International Learning Opportunities (ILO) programme, which gives individuals in Wales the opportunity to spend up to eight weeks in sub-Saharan Africa working on projects designed to both enhance their leadership skills and deliver a developmental outcome for their hosts. 


Welsh Centre for International Affairs

Welsh Centre for International Affairs inspires people to learn about and take action on global issues so everyone in Wales can contribute to building a fairer and more peaceful world. Come to our stall to explore the future we want for global citizenship and global responsibility in Wales and with our partners.


Welsh Refugee Council

The Welsh Refugee Council seeks to empower asylum seekers and refugees to build new futures in Wales. Want to find out what it means to be a Nation of Sanctuary and the work of the Welsh Refugee Council? Come find our stall!

đź“… Tuesday 23rd May at 9:30-17.00 BST
đź“Ť USW Conference Centre, Treforest, CF37 1DL

The Global Solidarity Summit brings together individuals and organisations from Wales working on solidarity projects across the world. From small community groups to Wales-based branches of international NGOs, we’re raising the profile of the sector in Wales.

The 2023 Summit will take place on Tuesday 23rd May at the University of South Wales Conference Centre in Treforest. Just minutes on foot from Treforest train station and with quick, easy access to the M4, this dedicated, purpose-built conference centre is just 20 minutes from the capital city.

(Re)Connecting Communities is the Summit theme. As we continue to adjust to post-Covid realities, this will be an invaluable opportunity to hear from leading voices in the sector while meeting and networking with colleagues and peers.

For the first time, the Summit will be a hybrid event, and participants will be able to join the plenary sessions and one workshop online if they cannot attend in person.

Kaleidoscope Trust executive director Lady Phyll and television presented and producer Mo Jannah will be our keynote speakers, with Welsh Government minister Jane Hutt MS delivering the opening address. Panelists for the afternoon discussion will consist of winners of the 2023 Partnership Awards.

The four workshops will cover a range of topics, including climate change, land rights, digital inclusion and data-led communication. A safeguarding fringe event and a drumming workshop will be held during the lunch break, and the day will conclude with a networking reception.

We’re looking forward to seeing you in Treforest or online!

Catch up on the 2021 and 2022 Global Solidarity Summit videos on-demand on our YouTube channel.

Registration

09:30 – 10:00

Delegates are encouraged to arrive in good time. Tea and coffee will be provided during registration.


Welcome and Opening Address

10:00 – 10:30

Jane Hutt MS, Minister for Social Justice, will deliver the opening address following a welcome to delegates to the 2023 Global Solidarity Conference by Claire O’Shea, Head of Partnership at Hub Cymru Africa.

Online delegates will be able to watch this session.


Morning Keynote Address

10:30 – 11:00

Phyllis Opoku-Gyimah (aka Lady Phyll), Co-Founder and Executive Director of UK Black Pride and Executive Director of Kaleidoscope Trust, will deliver the morning keynote address.

Online delegates will be able to watch this session and ask questions via Slido.


Workshops

11:30 – 12:30

Four workshops will be available to delegates attending in person:

1. Practical Responses to Climate Change

Climate change is already harming people across the world and many parts of Africa have been ravaged by droughts, floods and severe weather. This workshop will look at what Wales-Africa partnerships can do to understand and reduce the environmental impacts of their work. We will also talk about how project work, including support for Fair Trade producers, can help communities to adapt to a changing climate.

2. Land rights and ownership: issues facing women and indigenous communities

Many women and indigenous communities across Africa have no access to land nor the right to buy or inherit land. This reduces their ability to earn money or grow food for their families, restricting economic development and efforts to achieve equality. This workshop will look at the roots, complexities and implications of the problem, including laws and social customs. It is an opportunity to learn more, share experiences and explore what Welsh-African partnerships can do to support women and indigenous communities seeking and protecting land.

3. Engaging your audience effectively: data led communications

This workshop is aimed at groups and people who want to build support and communicate effectively with their audiences. Development Engagement Lab will show us the latest research on attitudes to aid and how that can be used to shape the way you talk about your work based on data, research and audience insight.

We will make this workshop available for online delegates.

4. Digital inclusion in Africa

By the end of the decade, 230 million jobs in Africa will require some level of digital skills. What does this mean for the huge digital skills gap on the continent that is currently diluting economic opportunities? This workshop will focus on how the digital divide within and between African countries can be challenged, including by improving access to information technologies and increasing awareness of digital spaces for women, refugees and persons with disabilities.


Lunch | Safeguarding Fringe Workshop | Drumming Fringe Workshop

12:30 – 13:30

A vegetarian buffet will be provided. Dietary requirements can be detailed during registration through Eventbrite.

During the lunch break, a fringe workshop will be held for delegates to discuss their safeguarding support needs, and another workshop will allow delegates to try their hands at Gambian drumming.


Afternoon Keynote Address

13:30 – 14:00

Mo Jannah, BBC One Wales presenter, television producer and life coach, will deliver the afternoon keynote address.

Online delegates will be able to watch this session and ask questions via Slido.


Workshops

14:00 – 15:00

Four workshops will be available to delegates attending in person:

1. Practical Responses to Climate Change

Climate change is already harming people across the world and many parts of Africa have been ravaged by droughts, floods and severe weather. This workshop will look at what Wales-Africa partnerships can do to understand and reduce the environmental impacts of their work. We will also talk about how project work, including support for Fair Trade producers, can help communities to adapt to a changing climate.

2. Land rights and ownership: issues facing women and indigenous communities

Many women across Africa have no access to land nor the right to buy or inherit land. This reduces their ability to earn money or grow food for their families, restricting economic development and efforts to achieve equality. This workshop will look at the roots, complexities and implications of the problem, including laws and social customs. It is an opportunity to learn more, share experiences and explore what Welsh-African partnerships can do to support women seeking land.

3. Engaging your audience effectively: data led communications

This workshop is aimed at groups and people who want to build support and communicate effectively with their audiences. Development Engagement Lab will show us the latest research on attitudes to aid and how that can be used to shape the way you talk about your work based on data, research and audience insight.

4. Digital inclusion in Africa

This workshop aims to facilitate discussion and bring awareness to digital inclusion in Africa. It will highlight the digital divide that exists not only between high- and low-income nations, but also within African nations; as well as in areas such as gender, ability and more on the African continent.


Panel Discussion

15:30 – 16:30

The panel will consist of winners of the 2023 Partnership Awards. Winners of the Awards will be announced on 16th May.

Online delegates will be able to watch this session and ask questions via Slido.


Networking Reception

16:30 – 17:00

Refreshments will be provided while delegates use this opportunity to meet, greet, catch up and network.


Carol Adams

Workshop: Practical responses to climate change

Carol Adams is Managing Director of Food Adventure Social Enterprise and leads on a learning exchange between Wales and Cameroon focusing on sustainable food processing. She is an Honorary Principal Lecturer at Cardiff Metropolitan University and has a background in social and economic development, and sustainable agri-food systems.

Carol is an avid knitter and enjoys making fruit and vegetable preserves. She is of Bahamian, American and Cameroonian heritage.


Rochelle Ampomah-Ababio

Workshop: Digital inclusion in Africa

Rochelle Ampomah-Ababio is the founder of The Three Es Africa, an e-learning community for women in Africa focused on career and personal development. She is also a trustee at Youth Link Networks, a charity that supports young women in Uganda to create reusable sanitary towels. In this role, she is responsible for building CSR relationships and ensuring the charity complies with all legal duties.

Her commitment to international issues is also reflected in her participation as a delegate at the United Nations Convention on the Rights of a Child and the first Pan-African Youth Summit to end FGM. Rochelle is preparing to become a trainee solicitor at Taylor Wessing, a leading UK law firm.


Molly Anders

Workshop: Engaging your audience effectively

Molly Anders is the Research, Impact, Communications and Engagement Lead at the Development Engagement Lab. She is also the Partner Activation Consultant for its work in Great Britain.

As a Research Fellow in the Department of Political Science, University College London, Molly studies public attitudes towards global poverty. A Fulbright scholar, her earlier research explored public attitudes and media coverage of aid efforts in the Middle East, as well as the presence of state-sponsored media support in Jordan, Palestine and Syria. She is a former UK senior correspondent for Devex.


Lorna Brown

Workshop: Practical responses to climate change

Lorna Brown is the co-founder of the charity Dolen Ffermio (Farming Link), which has rural community links with Ngora and Kamuli districts in the Eastern Region of Uganda. She is the Wales lead on livestock breeding, agroforestry, renewable energy and biogas projects.

As a veterinary surgeon, Lorna specialises in breeding technology for sheep and goats. She worked as a lecturer and researcher in Nigeria and Kiribati before running a mixed veterinary practice in Wales.


Barbara Davies-Quy

Workshop: Land rights and ownership

Barbara Davies-Quy is Deputy Director of Size of Wales. She leads on policy work to tackle overseas deforestation footprint and manage Size of Wales work overseas to protect tropical forests and grow trees.

Barbara has over 15 years of international development experience supporting indigenous and local communities to protect their lands and forests, develop sustainable livelihood opportunities and tackle climate change. She has led international advocacy work at UK, European Union and United Nations levels.


Jane Hutt MS

Opening Address

Jane Hutt MS is Minister for Social Justice and Chief Whip in the Welsh Government. Among her ministerial responsibilities are the Wales and Africa programme; digital inclusion; equality and human rights; coordination of issues relating to asylum seekers and refugees; national implementation of the Well-being of Future Generations framework; and the Social Partnership and Public Procurement Bill.

Jane spent part of her childhood in Uganda and Kenya, and has lived and worked in Wales since 1972. A member of the Senedd since its creation in 1999, she has served in every administration to date and in several of the most senior roles in government, including as Minister for Finance and Leader of the House.


Mo Jannah

Afternoon Keynote Address

Mo Jannah is a television presenter, producer, life coach and entrepreneur. Growing up in Cardiff, he worked with young offenders and youth services before making the move into broadcasting through the It’s My Shout training programme, which helps develop new talent for the film and television industry in Wales.

In 2018, Mo was the subject of the New Voices from Wales episode “Mo’s World”, a documentary focusing on his life coaching work and interventions with young marginalised men from Cardiff and Newport. He has since became a regular face to viewers of BBC One Wales as a reporter on the consumer rights show X-Ray. Mo also developed a sports documentary for BBC Wales and authored his own on-line series about Black History.


N’famady KouyatĂ©

Fringe event: Drumming workshop

N’famady KouyatĂ© is Artistic Director and Joint CEO of The Successors of the Mandingue. He is a master balafonist, singer, percussionist, multi-instrumentalist, and the founder of Les HĂ©ritiers du Mandingue, a traditional Mandingue-modern fusion group in Guinea.

Born into a griot/djeli family with hereditary responsibility for preserving traditional Mandingue culture through the sharing of ancient rhythms, songs, and stories, N’famady now resides in Cardiff. He has pioneered several solo and collaborative musical projects, and is an energetic participatory music workshop leader.


Thembi Mnisi

Workshop: Practical responses to climate change

[Biography coming soon]
Paolo Morini

Workshop: Engaging your audience effectively

Paolo Morini is a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Political Science, University College London. As a Development Engagement Lab researcher, he researches how messengers, messages and images can be used as part of global poverty campaigns to engage the public in France, Germany, Great Britain and the United States.

Paolo’s ongoing projects include comparative research to understand what drives public support for development aid, and decisions to volunteer time for or donate money to global poverty causes.


Phoebe Ndiema

Workshop: Land rights and ownership

Phoebe Ndiema works with the Chepkitale Indigenous People Development Project to ensure the tenure, environmental and human rights of the Ogiek people. She leads on gender justice projects that focus on leadership and governance, economic empowerment, and capacity building. She also leads the Boititap Korenyo (“Wealth of Our Land”) project to map the Ogiek’s territory and resources, and another project that documents the history of the 32 clans that define the Ogiek community.

Phoebe has been a Fellow at Oxford University in the Department of Biology, developing a community led biodiversity monitoring system. She was born and raised in the Mt. Elgon region of western Kenya and is part of the Ogiek indigenous community.


Phyll Opoku-Gyimah (Lady Phyll)

Morning Keynote Address

Phyll Opoku-Gyimah is the nucleus of the award-winning celebration and protest that is UK Black Pride. Widely known as Lady Phyll – partly due to her decision to reject an MBE in the New Year’s Honours’ list to protest Britain’s role in formulating anti-LGBTQI+ penal codes across its empire – she is also the executive director of Kaleidoscope Trust, an organisation working to uphold the human rights of LGBTQI+ people around the world; a community builder and organiser; an Albert Kennedy Trust patron; and a public speaker focusing on race, gender, sexuality and class.

She’s regularly called upon to advise nascent LGBTQI+ organisations around the world to help leaders create cogent organising strategies, establish robust partnership networks and work effectively in service of the LGBTQI+ community.


Joe Robinson

Workshop: Practical responses to climate change

[Biography coming soon]
Graham Thursby

Fringe event: Safeguarding for small organisations

Graham Thursby is Safeguarding and HR Adviser at Bond. He leads the coordination and delivery of Bond’s safeguarding work to secure sector-wide improvements in the quality and consistency of safeguarding in development assistance and humanitarian aid.

Graham is also responsible for developing and delivering improvements to Bond’s internal HR policies and processes.


Pubudini Wickramaratne

Workshop: Land rights and ownership

Pubudini Wickramaratne is the Land Rights Policy Lead at Oxfam International. Leading global policy advocacy, she works closely with country offices and regions to ensure that communities fighting for their land rights are supported and their voices are heard at national and global policy forums. Prior to joining Oxfam International, she served as the country director of the Centre on Housing Rights and Evictions in Sri Lanka.

Pubudini has over twenty years of experience working on policy advocacy on socio-economic rights, and land rights in particular. She is a lawyer by profession and has extensive experience in human rights and public law-related litigation in Sri Lanka.

Disability Information and Support Network

DISN is a diaspora network working with partners in Kenya and Wales. Through advocacy and training, our mission is to build communities in which people with disabilities can realise their potential as equal and active citizens, in control of their lives. We also work with fair trade retailers to support disabled craftsmen and -women to sell their products.


Fair Trade Wales

Fair Trade Wales grows, supports and promotes the Fair Trade movement. This year, we’re celebrating 15 years since Wales made history in becoming the world’s first Fair Trade Nation. Head over to our stall to learn about Fair Trade, our plans to celebrate, and how your ethical choices compare to those of the wider Welsh public.


FLOW (Care for Uganda)

FLOW is the community health team of Care for Uganda, providing funding and support for motorbike ambulances and Village Health Teams in the rural district of Lowero. The stall will be selling jewellery, greetings cards, stationery, toys, purses, textiles and other crafts made in Uganda. We also have locally made crafts using textiles from Uganda.


Kanuma Krafts

We work with batik artists trying to keep alive the handwork industry of traditional methods which take many years to learn. We do original dying using kola nuts and indigo herbs and we work with local tailors who produce garments by machine and hand, for a living wage, putting modern themes into traditional techniques.


Size of Wales

Size of Wales supports Indigenous and local communities to protect and restore tropical forests and inspires climate action here in Wales. Come to our stall where you will find more about our inspiring overseas partners and what we can do here in Wales to tackle our overseas deforestation footprint.


Sub-Sahara Advisory Panel

Sub-Sahara Advisory Panel was formed by African diaspora groups in Wales to collectively advance their common interest in local issues affecting African communities in Wales as well as those in Africa. We utilise skills, capacity and knowledge found within Welsh African diaspora communities for the benefit of all. Come and talk to us about African communities in Wales and their connections to international solidarity and community development in Wales.


The Successors of the Mandingue

The Successors of the Mandingue are a Cardiff-based African arts organisation that builds bridges between musical cultures and brings together artists, communities, and their ideas. Join our lunchtime drumming workshop and visit our stall to learn about our upcoming Dathliad Cymru-Affrica (“Wales-Africa Celebration”) Festival in Bethesda (1st-3rd June) and Cardiff (10th-11th June).


Tropical Health and Education Trust

THET supports health partnerships between UK and overseas health institutions. Come to our stall to hear from marginalised voices of diaspora NHS staff in Experts in Our Midst. Learn how these staff members play a valuable role in health partnerships, the scale of their engagement, and the challenges they face, and how to promote their positive impact on global health projects.


Wales and Africa (Welsh Government)

The Wales and Africa programme supports people in Wales to take action on poverty in Africa. Visit our stall to learn about the Welsh Government’s International Learning Opportunities (ILO) programme, which gives individuals in Wales the opportunity to spend up to eight weeks in sub-Saharan Africa working on projects designed to both enhance their leadership skills and deliver a developmental outcome for their hosts. 


Welsh Centre for International Affairs

Welsh Centre for International Affairs inspires people to learn about and take action on global issues so everyone in Wales can contribute to building a fairer and more peaceful world. Come to our stall to explore the future we want for global citizenship and global responsibility in Wales and with our partners.


Welsh Refugee Council

The Welsh Refugee Council seeks to empower asylum seekers and refugees to build new futures in Wales. Want to find out what it means to be a Nation of Sanctuary and the work of the Welsh Refugee Council? Come find our stall!