The Global Solidarity Summit brings together individuals and organisations from Wales working on solidarity projects across the world. From small community to Wales-based branches of international NGOs, we’re raising the profile of the sector in Wales.

This year, however, we are moving our summit online. The COVID-19 pandemic has forced new ways of working and living, changed our priorities and caused significant disruption, for better or worse.

We have also renamed what was the International Development Summit to the Global Solidarity Summit. This follows a programme of events and self-discovery at Hub Cymru Africa as part of the #ReframingTheNarrative project.

We’re aiming to reframe the established narrative surrounding the aid sector from one steeped in problematic post-colonial assumptions to one of solidarity, respect and healing.

Fundamental to this process is the recognition that there will be no positive change unless we do things differently at the individual and collective levels. We must acknowledge that we are all part of the problem as well as the solution, however well intentioned our efforts. That means transforming ourselves and the institutions we’ve created if we are serious about transforming the broader structures that dispossess and discriminate against certain groups of people, wherever in the world they live.

We need to work in solidarity.

#GlobalUndod2021

The Global Solidarity Summit brings together individuals and organisations from Wales working on solidarity projects across the world. From small community groups to Wales-based branches of international NGOs, we’re raising the profile of the sector in Wales.

This year, however, we are moving our summit online. The COVID-19 pandemic has forced new ways of working and living and changed our priorities.

We have also renamed what was the International Development Summit to the Global Solidarity Summit. This follows a programme of events and self-discovery at Hub Cymru Africa as part of the #ReframingTheNarrative project.

We’re aiming to reframe the established narrative surrounding the aid sector from one steeped in problematic post-colonial assumptions to one of solidarity, respect and healing.

Fundamental to this process is the recognition that there will be no positive change unless we do things differently at the individual and collective levels. We must acknowledge that we are all part of the problem as well as the solution, however well intentioned our efforts. That means transforming ourselves and the institutions we’ve created if we are serious about transforming the broader structures that dispossess and discriminate against certain groups of people, wherever in the world they live.

We need to work in solidarity.

#GlobalUndod2021

Keynote Speech

Jane Hutt MS | Deputy Minister for International Affairs, Welsh Government.

Cyfrifoldeb byd-eang Cymru i’r dyfodol

[WELSH LANGUAGE]

Brexit and a global pandemic have had huge ramifications on Wales’ place in the world. But Welsh law and United Nations goals put a responsibility on us to behave in a globally responsible way, mindful of our impact on future generations and people across the world. What is the future for Wales as a gobally responsible nation? Join us for a panel discussion and Q&A as we explore what the future holds for our country.

Tyfu lan gyda Ddinasyddiaeth Fyd-eang:

Sut gallwn ddatblygu dinasyddion moesegol?

[WELSH LANGUAGE]

This workshop is of particular interest to groups who engage with schools to talk about their work. Participants will gain a better understanding of where Global Citizenship fits within the current educational and wider context and share practical ideas about how to engage with schools.  We will explore a range of resources for dealing with global issues in fun and thought-provoking ways, then share experiences and ideas, including the impact of COVID and the challenges and opportunities it brings. This workshop should enable participants to feel more confident about delivering a range of activities to support global citizenship in schools. 

Money Transfers: Methods & Challenges

An opportunity for Wales Africa groups to share experiences and challengs of transfering money to partners in Africa.

Book Club:

#FutureGen: Lessons from a small country

Listen again to our Book Club session to discuss your thoughts and feelings on “#futuregen: Lessons from a Small Country” by Jane Davidson.

We were joined by the author to hear what she thinks that governments, policy makers and activists around the world can learn from the creation and implementation of the Well-being of Future Generations Act in Wales.

Climate Cymru: Taking Wales to COP26

Our climate and natural world are in crisis, threatening our communities, our ways of life, and our beautiful Welsh places. This November, world leaders will gather in Glasgow to decide the next steps in humanity’s bid to avoid catastrophic climate change. It’s a real chance to create a better future for our communities, both here in Wales and around the world.

There is hope. But we need to make sure our leaders know just how much we care.Join us as we present Climate Cymru – the campaign to take 50,000 voices from Wales to COP26. Add your voice with us.

Youth Activism & Climate Change

Youth migration as a result of climate change / Climate-induced Migration.

This workshop operated primarily through a stakeholder engagement approach. During the one hour session, key issues involving the interrelationships between climate change, migration as a result of climate change, youth and internationalism were highlighted and presented by speakers in the form of interactive lectures and active participation from the audience.

Climate Justice & Farming Futures

By Fair Trade Wales

Pacari chocolates aren’t just any chocolates. They are biodynamic, regenerative, organic, locally owned, packaged at source chocolates. With cocoa being one of the main products implicated in deforestation, this is an impressive feat.

Join us to hear from Santiago Peralta, one of the founders of Pacari, and Erinch Sahan, Chief Executive of the World Fair Trade Organisation who will talk about climate justice, the farming we all need to embrace to ensure there is a future, and the pioneering businesses that put people and planet first. Session includes Q&A.

Digital working to be COVID-safe and climate friendly

Digital tools have been invaluable during the pandemic to keep connected to our global partners. Necessity has also shown what’s possible without travel and pointed the way to a lower carbon ways of working in the future. This workshop will provide: an overview of some of the tools available; opportunities to hear from practitioners about their work and a chance to ask questions about which tools are right for your work.

 

Performance: Circus Zambia

Join us for thrilling and engaging performances from Circus Zambia.

Circus Zambia is a youthful and vibrant social circus company that equips young people from vulnerable backgrounds in Zambia with circus and life skills while providing educational and employment opportunities. They do this so young people can blossom and become change-makers in their community.

Donor Perspectives on project fundamentals

This session will help viewers to:

  • Understand language and terminology in relation to sustainability
  • Understand different types of sustainability
  • Understand how to demonstrate project sustainability
  • Understand how donors act sustainably and understand how to effectively support partners to use the development tools after the project ends.

Speakers:

  • Stephanie Schlipper, MannionDaniels
  • Cat Miller, WCVA
  • Mitali Sen, The National Lottery Community Fund

Bod yn gyfrifol yn fyd-eang: Cydweithio er lles

[WELSH LANGUAGE]

The world is increasingly divided and xenophobic; suspicion of ‘the other’ is rife. What can we do? In this session we will explore ways of bringing people with us on a regenerative journey to make the world a better place for all of us (economically, socially, environmentally and culturally). Topics for discussion will include knowing ourselves, understanding others, how to provide non-judgemental spaces for discussing polarising opinions that cause offence in a reactive social-media driven society. Complexity is the norm. Being globally responsible means acknowledging the past, coming to terms with the present and collaborating to co-create a future with humility. 

How to grow?

Fundraising and beyond with Bees for Development

Join Janet Lowore from Bees for Development for a behind-the-scenes look at how they have grown in recent years and built upon fundraising experiences. Bees for Development share their insights into grant applications, online fundraising platforms, community events, patrons, supporters and managing data – as some approaches work better than others! This session will provide you with the opportunity to see inside a multi-faceted organisation and ask questions throughout so you can find out more about what’s relevant to your work.

Why a Healthy Planet Needs a Healthy Wales

With Prof. David Pencheon & Jane Davidson

Join Jane Davidson, former Welsh Government Minister, activist and author of “#futuregen: Lessons from a Small Country” and David Pencheon, OBE, founder Director of the NHS Sustainable Development Unit (England) and Honorary Professor at Exeter University.

Passionate advocates for sustainable development and building movements for change, they will take you through an inspiring discussion on why a healthy planet needs a healthy Wales.

Towards gender justice: Women and girls in the lead

The aim of this session was to profile and celebrate some of the groundbreaking work taking place on gender equality and learn about current issues and priorities for organisations working towards gender justice.

We heard from Akili Dada, and FORWARD UK to talk about the approach of their organisation, and why this works; the challenges, and how we can work together to drive this agenda forward.

Speakers:

  • Sankara Caroline, Executive Director, Akili Dada
  • Adwoa Kwateng Kluvitse, Head of Global Advocacy and Partnerships, FORWARD UK

Pressing for progress:

Taking a Gender Equality and Social Inclusion Approach in Health Partnerships

By THET

Gender Equality and Social Inclusion (GESI) are increasingly recognised as critical to meeting the ambitions set out in the SDGs and reaching the populations most in need. In this session we will explore what GESI means, why it is important, and the tools that can be used to design and deliver more inclusive and equitable projects. Through a combination of presentations and practical exercises you will have a chance to challenge yourself and others, before reflecting on the ways in which the concepts and tools shared in the session can be integrated in your work.

Please see THET GESI toolkit.

Moving the Goalposts:

Harnessing the power of sport

Dorcas Amakobe is serving as the executive director of Moving The Goalposts (MTG). She holds a Bachelors degree in Environmental Studies, Community Development from Pwani University. She is an alumnus of the Feminist Leadership, Movement Building and Rights Institute East Africa.

Moving the Goalposts have supported over 9,000 girls in Kenya, using football to harness their potential. Dorcas has strong links with Welsh organisation United Purpose, through which Urdd apprentices travelled to Kenya to develop their sports and leadership skills.

 

Different Perspectives:

Engaging people with disabilities through arts and sports

Explore how arts and sports can be used to amplify different perspectives, support change and challenge stigma and stereotypes associated with persons with disabilities in Wales and beyond.

During this workshop, you will hear from local activists in Wales and in Africa on how they have used arts and sports in their programmes; the impact on individuals and communities involved and the potential of these activities to mobilise change.

 

Gathering Informed Consent

This session covered consent: what it is (and isn’t), why it’s the cornerstone of ethical practices, when you need it and in what format, and what a consent form looks like.

Black Lives Matter:

Racism in International Development

Off the back of a packed year of events exploring racism in the sector and efforts to reframe the narrative, join the Sub-Sahara Advisory Panel (SSAP) as they host a collaborative session exploring racism in the international development sector and discuss ways in which we can move to a new way of working which prioritises solidarity with partners.

Partnership Lessons from COVID-19

This session will explore learning from two Health Partnership projects implementing responses to the Covid 19 pandemic in different contexts. There will be an update on the current situation in Africa, followed by presentations from Mothers of Africa in Zambia, and Dolen Cymru in Lesotho.

Speakers:

Dr Job Mwanza, Noriah Buleya, Dr Professor Judith Hall, from Mothers of Africa, Zambia.

Dr Moseme Makhele, Dr Mosa Talhale, Dr Kate Shakespeare, from Dolen Cymru project, Lesotho.

Privilege & Decision-making

Come and learn how racism can show up in our work, how our whiteness/privilege impacts decision making, how we move decision making into the right place and how to think about racism in our project work.

 

Reframing the Narrative

Bringing the 2021 Global Solidarity Summit to a close with a celebration of the Wales-Africa Community.

Meet the photographers from our ‘Back in the Day’ project as they share their thoughts on what development means to them as we look at their photos from the past.

We also reflected on the changes in the narrative around Africa and through looking back will set the scene for looking forward.